20 Best Vietnamese Dishes

20 Best Vietnamese Dishes

Vietnamese cuisine will leave you speechless. The typical flavors of Vietnamese cuisine are salty, sweet, sour, and hot and may be found in both street vendors and high-end restaurants. Whether you’re in the mood for a quick lunch in Hanoi or a leisurely dinner in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnamese cuisine is among the region’s best. If you’re wondering where to eat the best in Vietnam, go no further.

Vietnam is a beautiful place to visit with its gorgeous scenery and fantastic food. When in Vietnam, don’t miss out on Vietnamese cuisine. It has a great flavor, but it’s also quite affordable and packed with nutrients. Here are the top 20 most popular Vietnamese dishes that you should taste at least once in your life.

1. Bun Cha

In Hanoi, Vietnam, Bun Cha has its origins. If you’ve ever been to Hanoi, bun cha can be found on nearly every street. This meal has been around for a long time and is still popular today.

Untrained eyes can mistake Bun Cha for a dish of meatballs. On the other hand, Buncha has a distinct flavor, unlike any Italian meatballs. Besides pork, other ingredients commonly found in bun chai include fish sauce, onions, garlic, sugar, and even caramel sauce in rare instances.

Bun cha has a sweet and salty flavor due to the sugar (and sometimes caramel sauce) used. Over rice noodles or vermicelli noodles, bun cha is typically served. Other options include lettuce and other veggies.

Bun Cha
Bun Cha

2. Phở

The name “ph” comes from the noodle used in this dish, making it classic Vietnamese food. Flat rice noodles dance with medium-rare beef slivers of cooked chicken in robust beef stock. Pho Hanoi is the better-known of the two notable variations. It has a clear broth and is merely garnished with a squirt of lemon and a few slices of bird’s eye Chile. A murkier broth with a scent of fresh herbs, including bean sprouts, basil, and mint, characterize ph Nam, a version from the south.

The key to a delicious bowl of soup is the quality of the stock. Star anise, cloves, and cinnamon are commonly used to enhance the soup’s flavor. This dish can be found on nearly every street corner, and it’s eaten for breakfast.

Pho
Pho

3. Gỏi Cuốn (Spring Rolls)

Gi cun, which means “salad rolls,” should not be confused with ch gi, another name for fried rolls. The cigar-shaped rolls, which are clear, are filled with greens, shrimp or pork, and herbs. Almost every part of Vietnam has its spring roll style, but wrapping and rolling are pretty much the same no matter where you are.

Goi Cuon Spring Rolls
Goi Cuon Spring Rolls

4. Banh Mi – Vietnamese Sandwich

Banh Mi, like Pho, has enthralled foreigners with Vietnamese cuisine. It’s a meal that Vietnamese people take great pride in. History buffs will be aware that the French had previously occupied Vietnam. As a result, Banh Mi, another famous Vietnamese cuisine, has French influences. But the people in Vietnam have altered this dish by adding other items like egg, pork, cucumber, and herbs to their version. This meal was traditionally served for breakfast in Saigon. It has become a national favorite and a staple of many a street vendor’s menu.

Bread, egg, pate, BBQ pork, cucumber, tomato, carrot, and herbs are all you need for an essential Banh Mi. As a last resort, you can always increase the flavor by adding other cooked steak or sausage items. Banh Mi is a well-known Vietnamese dish. Therefore it can be found throughout the country. Food carts, street stalls, and restaurants all offer Banh Mi.

Banh Mi Vietnamese Sandwich
Banh Mi Vietnamese Sandwich

5. Banh Xeo (Sizzling Pancakes)

Vietnamese pancakes are big, cheap, and full of shrimp, pork, bean sprouts, and egg. Before eating, they are fried, wrapped in rice paper with greens, and dipped in Nuoc Cham, which is a fish sauce.

Ho Chi Minh City is the best place to try Banh xeo, which means “sizzling pancake.” But it’s also a snack you should stock up on if you’re going on a long train or bus trip. It’s the perfect thing to eat on those long trips. When we’re talking about long trips, you’ll need to get off the tourist trail if you want to see the real Vietnam.

Banh Xeo Sizzling Pancakes
Banh Xeo Sizzling Pancakes

6. Bun Bo Hue (Spicy Beef & Pork Noodle Soup)

In terms of Vietnamese soup, there is no better choice than bun Bo hue. Hue, the city where this meal is from, is hinted at in the dish’s name. On the other hand, this soup is not for the faint of heart, as it frequently contains pig knuckles and blood.

Do not be deterred from tasting bun Bo hue because of the ingredients list. The combination of umami flavors, lemongrass, and a smoky edge makes this soup a real treat. Noodles of rice are stuffed with red cabbage, cilantro, basil, mint, and various other herbs and spices.

Bun Bo Hue Spicy Beef Pork Noodle Soup
Bun Bo Hue Spicy Beef Pork Noodle Soup

7. Cơm Tấm

A fried egg, caramelized grilled pork chop, and a big pile of broken rice are all served together. Next, a chili sauce, fish sauce, and sugar are drizzled over the meal, followed by a splash of green onion oil. Pickled daikon and carrots, cucumber slices, and a fried pork rind-and-shallot garnish round out the final touches.

To Kho Ca Kho (Caramelized Fish in Clay Pot), Clay pots are the Dutch oven’s Asian cousin. To soften and caramelize meats when braising, the thick clay walls help to retain heat and moisture. The fish is coated with sweet-savory ooze from the sugar and fish sauce during the lengthy cooking process. My Vietnamese acquaintance, which grew up on this classic comfort food, exclaimed, “This reminds me of my granny.”

Com Tam
Com Tam

8. Banh Cuon – Stuffed Pancake

In addition to Banh Mi, Banh Cuon is a popular Vietnamese dish that may be enjoyed throughout the day. Those who live in the area can eat it as their main course. Rice flour is steamed into paper-thin sheets to make Banh Cuon. Rolled up with minced pork, it’ll be ready to be devoured! It will be garnished with golden brown dried onion before it is served. You’ll also be done with a spicy-sweet sauce, which is an essential dish component.

Rice must be husked until finely ground and then blended with water to form Banh Cuon’s batter. You eat it with Cha (Vietnamese pig sausage) to get extra nutrition and flavor from Banh Cuon. You eat it with Cha (Vietnamese pig sausage). Banh Cuon is a traditional Vietnamese meal that dates back generations. And it’s available in a wide range of Vietnamese cities and provinces.

Banh Cuon Stuffed Pancake
Banh Cuon Stuffed Pancake

9. Cha Ca (Turmeric Fish)

Vietnamese cuisine is renowned for its seafood dishes. Cha ca, which is said to have been invented in Hanoi, is the most popular. Served with rice noodles and a sprinkle of peanuts, it has white fish sautéed in butter with dill and spring onions.

One of the best spots to eat Vietnamese seafood is Da Nang, located in central Vietnam. Da Nang’s seafood-based specialties make it an ideal location to sample Cha ca. You can’t beat Bun cha ca, which is a fishcake noodles soup, in terms of local fare.

Cha Ca Turmeric Fish
Cha Ca Turmeric Fish

10. Mi Vit Tiem (Braised Duck Noodle Soup)

It is another soup, but instead of having sweet ingredients, it highlights the savory flavors of roasted duck in it. Although the dish Mi Vit Tiem has its origins in Chinese cuisine, Vietnamese cooking has unquestionably influenced it. Egg noodles are used in place of rice noodles in this dish. This soup has the potential for quite a bit of heat.

Mi Vit Tiem Braised Duck Noodle Soup
Mi Vit Tiem Braised Duck Noodle Soup

11. Cao Lầu

Cao Lu, a specialty of Hoi an, is incomparable. This mouthwatering bowl of ramen pays homage to the port city, where it all began with a blend of Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese flavors. Cao Lu noodles are sprinkled with slices of Chinese barbecued pork. Fresh herbs and crumbled pig cracklings are then spread over the thick noodles, which have the same weight as Japanese Udon. According to legend, authentic cao lu is brewed using water from Hoi An’s legendary, a thousand-year-old Ba Le well.

Cao Lau
Cao Lau

12. Canh (Vietnamese Soups)

Soup is a huge category, and it’s impossible to include it all here. Sour soups, known as “Canh Chua” in Vietnamese, are another prominent component of Vietnamese cuisine. They have various flavors and textures (sour, sweet, and savory) (different veggies and seafood).

Canh Vietnamese Soups
Canh Vietnamese Soups

13. Banh Goi – Fried Pillow Cake

Known as Banh Goi because of its pillow-like structure, it is a popular dish among Vietnamese during the colder months. Green papaya and carrots flavor the wonderful sauce.

There are two primary elements of Banh Goi. Water and rice flour are used to make the outer skin, and various other ingredients are combined to create the filling. This dish is made by chopping together noodles made from glass, wood ears, minced pork, an egg, and mushrooms and adding some spices. There’s a dipping sauce made of lime juice, sugar, and fish sauce that includes garlic and Chile powder for the cake. Fresh herbs like lettuce and coriander are included in the Banh Goi dish when it is served.

Banh Goi Fried Pillow Cake
Banh Goi Fried Pillow Cake

14. Mi Quang (Noodle Soup)

Mi Quang, a Hanoi delicacy, is an underappreciated and inexpensive noodle meal. While each restaurant’s ingredients may differ, you can generally count on a simple bowl of pork noodles topped with various tasty toppings such as flavored oils, fresh herbs, shrimp, peanuts, mint, and quail eggs.

You can’t go wrong with Mi Quang, a Vietnamese noodle dish staple of the Hanoi street food scene. Turmeric bone broth, yellow noodles, and fragrant herbs on top are traditionally served for supper, and you’ll be counting down the minutes until you can dip into them.

Mi Quang Noodle Soup
Mi Quang Noodle Soup

15. Hu Tieu (Pork And Seafood Noodle Soup)

You might also try Hu Tieu if you’re looking for something to warm you up. Even while regional variations on this meal make it challenging to pin down a single recipe, each has its unique appeal. Pork and fish are almost always present in this dish. Soup made from hog bones is called Hu Tieu. Besides that, there is no conventional recipe for noodles, vegetables, and herbs.

Hu Tieu Pork And Seafood Noodle Soup
Hu Tieu Pork And Seafood Noodle Soup

16. Cơm Gà

This is a winning combination: chicken and rice. However, in Hi An, these two delectable dishes are improved by using locally sourced fresh ingredients. To go with a turmeric rice bowl, thinly sliced chicken breasts are shredded and combined with fish sauce and onions. On the side are pickled shallots, radishes, and herbs. Curcumin rice is a specialty of several different restaurants across the country. To counteract the tangy marinade and the soft, young eggs in the traditional Hi chicken rice, a few leaves of Vietnamese coriander and spicy mint are sprinkled on top. A bowl of golden chicken rice is just what the doctor ordered after a long day of walking around the Ancient Town.

Com Ga
Com Ga

17. Ga Nuong (Barbeque Chicken)

In all intents and purposes, it is Vietnam’s take on BBQ chicken. You will be astounded by the fact that Ga Nuong may be cooked for such a long time but will remain succulent rather than dry. This is another one of those Vietnamese recipes that took us entirely by surprise. It is a pleasant change of pace from all of the soups.

Ga Nuong Barbeque Chicken
Ga Nuong Barbeque Chicken

18. Nem Ran – Fried Spring Rolls

Nem Ran is a popular Vietnamese meal from north to south. The dish is served at numerous restaurants in Vietnam and other countries that operate Vietnamese food. Wrapper, filling, and dipping sauce make Nem Ran. The wrapper is a circle or square of rice flour paper.

Minced pork, egg, carrot, glass noodle, wood ear mushroom, herbs, and spices make up the stuffing. Based on regional eating patterns and personal preferences, some regions substitute fish or beef for minced pigs. None of the ingredients they’re well-mixed and wrapped in rice paper. Deep-fried rolls are yellow. This dish’s dipping sauce contains fish sauce, lemon juice, sugar, Chile, and pepper.

Rice, noodles, red sticky rice, and salad are common accompaniments to Nem Ran. During the Lunar New Year, Vietnamese people will eat the dish virtually every day because it’s delicious and visually appealing. Second, even if you aren’t a trained chef, you can create Nem Ran at home with minimal effort.

Nem Ran Fried Spring Rolls
Nem Ran Fried Spring Rolls

19. GaTan (Poached Chicken Soup)

Ga Tan is the place to go if you want something like the soup your grandmother used to make. It is a warm, very healthy soup that will help clear your sinuses if they are clogged. It has a lot of chicken and herbs in it. The smell and taste of ga tan can be potent.

GaTan Poached Chicken Soup
GaTan Poached Chicken Soup

20. Mì Quảng

Mi qung, a soup-salad hybrid, does an admirable job at faking an identity crisis. Despite this, don’t be deceived by m Qung’s refined appearance. Quang Nam Province in Central Vietnam serves this light and springy noodle dish as a roadside specialty. The turmeric-infused broth, cooked with a lot of peanut oil, gives the noodles their bright yellow color.

This “soup,” which may be topped with everything from shrimp and chicken to pork belly and snakehead fish, requires only a ladleful of water. Toss cut banana flowers, Vietnamese coriander stems, basil leaves, and toasted sesame rice crackers with m qung, Vietnamese rice noodles.

Mi Quang
Mi Quang