20 Street Foods Of Gwangjang Market, Seoul

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9. Tteokbokki Spicy Rice Cakes

Gwangjang Market is a well-known Korean street food market next to the Dongdaemun Design Plaza. This market serves various traditional Korean street food, including Mungbean pancakes and mandu (Korean dumplings). This is the spot to go in South Korea if you’re looking for traditional Korean cuisine. Gwangjang Market is a wonderland of food, with piles of food and hungry people eating in every direction. Many of the stalls at the market selling Korean street food are selling the same things. Eventually, everything will look so good that you won’t be able to decide, so you’ll just have to find a place to sit and start eating. There are several sections of the market, and as you wander around, you will encounter vendors offering clothing, fresh produce, and various other market goods. Most of the market, on the other hand, is made up of ready-made foods and is set up like an indoor food court or food warehouse. It has an incredible atmosphere.

1. Eomuk Bokkeum – Stir-Fried Fish Cake

South Korea’s peninsula location means fresh fish abounds. The food is served both as a main dish and as street food. Eomuk Bokkeum, which is made with fish, is popular street food in Korea. Eomuk, a deep-fried fishcake, is the dish’s star. The word comes from the Japanese meal Oden. Corvina or cuttlefish are low-fat seafood that makes good fish cakes. Eomuk can be cooked in several ways. Koreans stir-fry it with vegetables and dip it in Gochujang-infused soy sauce to make Eomuk Bokkeum. It’s a heartwarming way to spend a country night.

1. Eomuk Bokkeum – Stir Fried Fish Cake

2. Bibimbap

Bibimbap is one of Korea’s most popular foods. It translates to “mixed rice,” and it’s a popular dish that consists of white rice topped with vegetables, meat, a whole egg, and gochujang (red chili pepper paste). If the heat is too much for you, you can use soy sauce or Sriracha instead. The mixture of rice topped with namul, gochujang, soy sauce or doenjang is a staple of Korean. This dish is better known as bibimbap.

2. Bibimbap

3. Bungeo-Ppang

This is currently a favorite snack among many Asian children. This dessert takes the form of a fish and is filled with a sweetened version of red bean paste. This popular meal was carried over from Japan, where it originated and has since become a popular staple dish in the cuisine of Korean street vendors. Busan, the port city and the second-most populous city in South Korea, is where you should go if you want to have the best experience with Eomuk. Among its numerous tourist attractions is the enormous number of variations of Eomuk available for sale at food stalls and carts.

3. Bungeo ppang

4. Yukhoe (Marinated Raw Beef)

Yukhoe is yet another of the Gwangjang market’s specialties, although only the most daring eaters should try it. This is raw beef that has been marinated with a blend of Korean flavors – commonly pine nuts, sesame oil, and soy sauce. Yukhoe can be seen as the steak tartare of the Far East, and in some aspects, it even resembles it. The marinade makes for a rich flavor, but understandably this dish is not for everyone as it is raw beef!

4. Yukhoe Marinated raw beef

5. Mandu – Korean Dumpling

Two typical types of mandu or dumplings are distinct in Korea. The classic flavor and the kimchi mandu feature minced meat and vegetables, respectively. Kimchi mandu is only familiar in Korea they are so delicious, and you can’t leave this market without eating them. Mandu was a staple of Korean royal court cuisine for many years. Everyone can find something they like, such as fried gun-mandu or Jjin-mandu (steamed). Mandu is a dish prepared with flatbread, minced pork, glass noodle, and seasonings. Make sure to taste the authentic Korean version with kimchi stuffing. Whatever you purchase, the merchant will provide you with a takeaway box for convenience.

5. Mandu – Korean Dumpling

6. Banchan

There is a lot of food available, and there are also a lot of stands that sell banchan, which are small side dishes that are usually eaten with the main dish in Korean food. These bowls and containers made of stainless steel are used to show off the banchan. A lot of Koreans stop by and take some of the banchan, usually in smaller portions, to eat with their meals. Some stall owners make kimchi in their unique way in front of their customers.

6. Banchan

7. Makgeolli

It may surprise you to learn that Koreans take drinking very seriously. You’ve probably heard of soju, Korea’s answer to sake, but in traditional Gwangjang Market, the country’s original national alcoholic beverage, makgeolli, reigns supreme. Makgeolli is traditional rice-based liquor that looks milky and cloudy because it hasn’t been filtered. It tastes a little bit like light vodka, but a little bit sweeter. If you drink some makgeolli with your Gwangjang Market street food, the probiotics in the makgeolli will help you digest it.

7. Makgeolli

8. Kkwabaegi

There are several forms and flavors of Korean street food, but one rule applies to them. Thou shalt not eat them cold, or in other words, you have to eat them hot out of the pot or pan. The best example of the rule is Kkwabaegi, which are twisted doughnuts from Korea. The ingredients are simple, consisting only of yeast flour and other essential substances. The devil lies in twisting the dough into appealing forms and cooking the doughnuts until they are fluffy and crisp. To savor their fatty deliciousness, all you need to do is to heat them with a microwave.

8. Kkwabaegi

9. Tteokbokki: Spicy Rice Cakes

When it comes to Korean street cuisine, you’re undoubtedly familiar with this gently spicy, stir-fried rice cake, known as ddukbokki or dukbokki. Along with long cylindrical rice cakes known as garaetteok, other ingredients in this dish include everything from eggs to fish cakes in a sauce made from gochujang. The most popular dish is gungmul tteokbokki, which are spicy rice cakes cooked with soup, but gireeum tteokbokki, which are made with oil, are also famous. For people who don’t like spicy foods, there is a version of this dish called ganjang tteokbokki made with only soy sauce. In Korea, you can find tteokbokki at most Korean markets, subway stations, pochangmachas, and bunsik restaurants, affordable and casual eateries serving snack-like food.

9. Tteokbokki Spicy Rice Cakes

10. Mayak Gimbap – Korean Seaweed Rice Roll

It has a salty flavor and a pliable texture, thus it considerably improves the flavor and texture of meals. Gimbap is an excellent example of this trait. It is a roll consisting of cooked rice, sliced veggies, and seafood, wrapped around nori sheets. On the other hand, the traditional large size won’t be sold at roadside stands. The bite-sized Mayak Gimbap is the most prevalent dish sold by Korean street vendors. It’s a fourth the size of a regular Gimbap, so it’s considerably more portable. As a result, the snack is known as Kkoma Gimbap, which connotes a sense of cuteness and innocence. This version is easy to make at home with a high-tech Korean rice cooker. The special soy sauce that comes with Mayak Gimbap is made with sesame seeds, vinegar, and mustard crushed into it.

10. Mayak Gimbap – Korean Seaweed Rice Roll

11. Sannakji

Live octopus is available here, although I recommend getting it in Seoul or Bussan’s Jagalchi market. If you can’t go, try here. My favorite South Korean food. Freshly chopped octopus with sesame oil, seeds, and salt. You may need chopsticks to peel the writhing tentacles off the octopus, but don’t let that worry you.

11. Sannakji

12. Bindaetteok – Mung Bean Pancake

Gwangjang Market has a lot of delicious Korean food, but the bindaetteok pancakes made with mung beans are especially well-known in Seoul. Some of the stalls in the market are very well-known. With its crisp exterior and creamy insides, this dish had the perfect balance of texture. The soy vinegar onion side sauce enhanced the flavor of each bite of mung bean pancake. Bindaetteok is a greasy dish that you should taste at the Gwangjang market. Dazed by the fantastic flavors, the overwhelming richness of Korean street food, and the luscious culinary smells, patting my stomach with immense delight.

12. Bindaetteok – mung bean pancake

13. Hotteok

If savory pancakes aren’t your style, you might find that the more traditional sweet flavors of hotteok are more to your liking. Hotteok translates to “steamed buns.” Hotteok is another one of the iconic street delicacy that can be found at Gwangjang Market. These sweet pancakes are made from a dough made from wheat flour and are stuffed with ingredients such as brown sugar, cinnamon, honey, and almonds.

13. Hotteok

14. Boribap

Traditional boribap is rice and barley dishes served with doenjang stew and many side dishes in South Korea. Gochujang chile paste or doenjang are often used to season boribap meals, which are usually made up of a variety of greens and vegetables. Boribap can be served in various ways, from a simple bowl of rice and barley to a more complex supper in which you can choose your own banchan accompaniments, depending on where you live.

14. Boribap

15. Soondae (Sundae) – Blood Sausage

Blood plus a substantial amount of soft mung bean noodles or sticky rice contribute to the juiciness and juiciness of the Korean version of blood sausage. When you order a plate of Sundae, one of the large, long sausages will be removed from the endless steamer, sliced, and put on a platter .It is generally garnished with a few slices of lung and perilla leaves with chile salt.

15. Soondae Sundae – blood sausage

16. Kalguksu 

This traditional Korean soup is made with noodles cut with a knife in the Korean style. This soup is a great way to stay warm and cozy during the cold winter months. There are different kinds of Kalguksu, from those made with seafood to those made with beef. This soup has a mild taste, which means it’s not spicy. However, like most Korean dishes, it’s usually served with kimchi on the side.

16. Kalguksu

17. Garae-Tteok

Rice cakes without sauce are a fantastic dish in their own right and can be found at many street food vendors. The delicacy, known as Garae-tteok, entices diners with its natural sweetness and gluten-free status. Garae-tteok is often grilled over charcoal till crisp on the outside. When you dip the round rice cakes in honey or soy sauce, you’ll notice that the insides are soft and fluffy. Garae-tteok is also a key element in Tteokguk (rice cake soup), a traditional Korean New Year’s dish. The position emphasizes how important milky-white rice cakes are in Korean society.

17. Garae Tteok

18. Gelidium Amansii Noodles (Seaweed / Carrageenan Noodle)

Gelidium Amansii Noodles is a unique dish that caught our eye as soon as we saw it. The jelly, made of seaweed, was formed into noodles using extracted algae. Cucumber slices, nori seaweed, and ice provide a cooling sensation as the dish is served, along with vinegar, sesame seeds, and a dash of chile. It tasted delicious, and we vowed to come back again for the second bowl. The Koreans must have some great cooking skills to be able to make this seaweed, which is full of antioxidants and nutrients, into such a tasty dish.

18. Gelidium Amansii Noodles Seaweed Carrageenan Noodle

19. Dak-KkochiSkewered Chicken

Mirin, ginger, and garlic are used to marinate the chicken, then brushed with a sweet and sometimes spicy soy sauce. The skewers, which are usually made of sausages, eomuk, or even tteok galbi short ribs, can be found at street stalls all over the Hongdae area. Still, the best ones are suane chicken skewers, which include the classic soy-glazed chicken and scallion version, and even rice cakes wrapped in bacon.

19. Dak kkochiSkewered Chicken

20. Sweet Red Bean Pastries

If you’ve spent any amount of time in Korea, you’ve already encountered red bean snacks since they are a widely available delicacy sold from roadside carts, especially in the Bungeoppang variety (bite-size pastries in fish shapes). There’s a Bungeoppang vendor that regularly sets up shop outside my apartment building, and when I hear he’s there, I sprint to retrieve my red bean snacks. The sweetbread at Gwangjang market is a little larger, and the dough is filled with red bean paste and fried.

20. Sweet Red Bean Pastries