Top 20 Foods That Help Reduce Anxiety

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top 20 foods that help reduce anxiety

Yeah, we know how much dealing with anxiety sucks. Though anxiety is a part of life, we need healthy coping mechanisms to deal with it efficiently. To understand the positive side of life, we need dark times. But this can soon turn into an anxiety disorder if not dealt with properly. What you eat in a day has a significant impact on your mental health. Incorporating a few suggestions from this article can bring about a great deal of change in your mental health. 

1. Start Your Day With Yogurt And Berries

To obtain a dosage of brain-beneficial probiotics, include yogurt in your daily routine. It is not just a quick meal, but it also reduces stress. Probiotics may be involved in reducing anxiety symptoms and stabilizing mood, according to studies in mice and adults with IBS, anxiety, and depression. Another study of 67 people indicated that those who ingested probiotic yogurt daily were better at managing stress. Fresh blueberries will help you get even more of those anxiety-fighting nutrients. Blueberries are high in vitamin C and antioxidants, and studies show that including them in your diet can help with anxiety and sadness.

1. Start your day with yogurt and berries.

2. Green Tea

Green tea helps you fight morning stressors. An amino acid, L-theanine, found in green tea, is demonstrated to reduce anxiety and stress 1 to 3 hours after consuming 200 milligrams. An average cup of tea has about 25 milligrams of caffeine and takes half an hour to two hours to work. L-theanine has soothing effects while boosting dopamine, GABA levels, and serotonin in the brain areas that control hormones, metabolism, and memory.

2. Green Tea

3. Green-Leafy Vegetables

When you feel anxious, it is easy to grab a cheeseburger, but opt for a green meal instead. ‘Green green foods like spinach include folate, which helps you stay calm by producing dopamine, a pleasure-inducing brain chemical, according to a study. A research was conducted on 2800 middle-aged individuals that indicated that those who get ingested folate have reduced depression symptoms. 

3. Green leafy vegetables

4. Oatmeal 

If you are a carbohydrate addict, nothing will be able to keep you from a doughnut while you are stressed. Don’t completely deny the desire.  According to a study, carbs can aid in the production of serotonin, a brain chemical which is controlled by antidepressants. You should choose balanced carbohydrates over sugary foods. ‘Oatmeal is a complex carb that won’t add to your already high blood glucose levels,’ Mangieri explains. ‘Stress can increase blood sugar levels.’

4. Oatmeal

5. Pistachios

When you perform an activity repetitively, you silence the inner chaos which seems unpleasant to you. Consider crocheting or kneading bread, as well as shelling pistachios or peanuts. Relax with the rhythmic movements. Pistachios are also a diet-friendly snack since the extra act of cracking open a shell slows down your consumption. Pistachios also contain heart-healthy properties. ‘Eating pistachios may help relieve acute stress by reducing blood pressure and heart rate,’ adds Mangieri.

5. Pistachios

6. Dark Chocolate 

A small amount of dark chocolate on a regular basis (not a whole bar!) could help you manage your stress levels. ‘Research has shown that it can lower your stress chemicals, particularly cortisol,’ Sass says. The antioxidants in cocoa relax the walls of your blood vessels, lowering blood pressure and improving circulation. It contains natural chemicals which make you feel how you feel when you are in love. . Choose types with at least 70% cocoa content.

6. Dark Chocolate 1 1

7. Milk 

Fortified milk is high in vitamin D, which improves happiness. Reduced vitamin D levels were linked to an increased incidence of fear and depression in 5,966 men and women in 50-year research conducted by London’s UCL Institute of Child Health. Compared to subjects with the lowest amounts of vitamin D, those with appropriate levels had a lower incidence of panic disorders. Vitamin D is also abundant in salmon, egg yolks, and unsweetened yogurt.

7. Milk

8. Avocado 

Although devouring slice after slice of avocado toast may not be the healthiest option, eating regular servings of this superfruit may help to reduce stress eating by filling your stomach and making you feel full. Researchers at Loma Linda University (who, full disclosure, were financed by the Hass Avocado Board) had participants add half an avocado to their meals, reducing the desire to eat by 40%. If you feel stressed, that whole feeling will make you less likely to grab harmful snacks, raising your stress levels.

8. Avocado

9. Cashews

An ounce of cashew contains 11% of zinc which mainly helps in anxiety reduction. According to Nutrition and Metabolic Insights, patients diagnosed with both anxiety symptoms (irritability, inability to concentrate) and inadequate zinc levels received zinc supplements for eight weeks and experienced a 31 percent reduction in anxiety. Zinc affects the amount of a nerve neurotransmitter that influences mood. It is also rich in Omega-3s and protein that makes them a healthy snack. 

9. Cashews

10. Oranges 

Oranges are regarded to be a wonderful method to relax and reduce stress because they are high in vitamin C. ‘This essential nutrient aids in reducing cortisol levels, which may cause havoc on the body, as well as supporting immune function, which is harmed by stress,’ Sass explains. Symptoms like mental fog, increased appetite, weight gain, and fatigue start appearing when the cortisol level increases. 

10. Oranges

11. Fatty Fish 

Omega-3 is present in fatty fish, which includes salmon, mackerel, and herring. It is related to improved cognitive performance as well as mental health. Two crucial fatty acids are found in omega-3-rich meals that contain alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Two significant fatty acids are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). EPA and DHA help the brain work appropriately by regulating neurotransmitters, reducing inflammation, and promoting brain health.

11. Fatty Fish

12. Pumpkin Seeds 

Potassium-rich pumpkin seeds aid in maintaining electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation. Eating potassium-rich foods like pumpkin seeds or bananas can help alleviate stress and anxiety symptoms. Pumpkin seeds are high in the element zinc. In a research of 100 female high school students, zinc deficiency was found to have a negative impact on mood. Zinc helps in proper brain and nerve development. The most zinc storage sites in the body are in the brain regions associated with emotions.

12. Pumpkin seeds

13. Turmeric 

Turmeric is a frequently used spice in India, appearing in practically every meal. Curcumin is the active element in turmeric. Curcumin may help to reduce anxiety by lowering inflammation and oxidative stress, which are common in persons who suffer from anxiety and depression. Another study discovered that increasing curcumin in the diet boosted DHA and lowered anxiety. Turmeric is simple to incorporate into recipes. It goes nicely in smoothies, curries, and casseroles because of its mild flavor.

13. Turmeric

14. Chamomile 

Many individuals use chamomile tea as a herbal remedy because of its anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant, and soothing properties. According to some, the flavonoids in chamomile offer calming and anti-anxiety properties. In a recent study, chamomile was found to help with anxiety symptoms. Chamomile tea helps relieve anxiety. It is widely available and safe to take in large amounts.

14. Chamomile

15. Seaweed 

You are in luck, sushi fans. Seaweed wrapped over your spicy tuna roll provides additional stress-relieving properties. Studies show that seaweed contains iodine in abundance. 

15. Seaweed

16. Beetroot 

Research shows that one cup of beetroot juice fulfills 30% of everyday folate requirements. Too little folate consumption causes mental weariness, disorientation, forgetfulness and sleep deprivation. Hence, it is important to take in the minimum amount of folate required for the body. 

16. Beetroot

17. Oysters 

Oysters are considered to be aphrodisiacs, but their high zinc concentration is another incentive to enjoy the slimy little treats. Oysters have 32 mg of zinc per serving (6 raw oysters), 400% of the daily required amount. Zinc also helps the body to deal with stress. 

17. Oysters

18. Turkey breast 

The tryptophan present in the turkey causes the Thanksgiving hangover. This amino acid helps to make serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates hunger, contentment, and happiness. Tryptophan may have a soothing effect on its own. Nuts, seeds, tofu, seafood, lentils, oats, beans, and eggs are also high in tryptophan.

18. Turkey breast

19. Almonds 

Pack some almonds for those late-afternoon but not-quite-dinner munchies. Almonds, like avocados, are high in vitamin B. Almonds are good for your heart and brain because they balance neurotransmitters and reduce stress. Another anti-anxiety ingredient that is present in nuts in abundance is Magnesium.  One ounce of almonds contains nearly 20% of your daily necessary magnesium intake!

19. Almonds

20. Eggs 

Eggs aren’t just for brunch anymore. You can include it in your meal regardless of the time. Vitamin D is abundant in whole eggs. Eggs contain acetylcholine. It acts as a neurotransmitter and can regulate mood, which makes managing stress more manageable. These foods will not magically turn your bad days into happy ones but they will surely bring about a noticeable change in your mood and day. Make sure you stick to our suggestions and not binge eat because it may make you feel better for the time being, but in the long run, it will harm you. Take care, you!

20. Eggs